Places to Visit

Bannockburn Heritage Centre

The National Trust for Scotland launches Bannockburn Live.

The new Bannockburn visitor centre opened in March 2014, is a world class attraction in the making. It was opened by Scotland’s excellent First Minister Alex Salmond and has proven to be a massive success.

Stirling Castle

stirling-castle

Stirling Castle, located in Stirling, is one of the largest and most important castles, both historically and architecturally, in Scotland. The castle sits atop Castle Hill, an intrusive crag, which forms part of the Stirling Sill geological formation. It is surrounded on three sides by steep cliffs, giving it a strong defensive position. Its strategic location, guarding what was, until the 1890s, the farthest downstream crossing of the River Forth, has made it an important fortification from the earliest times. Most of the principal buildings of the castle date from the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries.

Wallace Monument

wallacemonument

The National Wallace Monument (generally known as the Wallace Monument) is a tower standing on the summit of Abbey Craig, a hilltop near Stirling in Scotland. It commemorates Sir William Wallace, the 13th century Scottish hero. The tower was constructed following a fundraising campaign, which accompanied a resurgence of Scottish national identity in the 19th century. In addition to public subscription, it was partially funded by contributions from a number of foreign donors, including Italian national leader Giuseppe Garibaldi. Completed in 1869 to the designs of architect John Thomas Rochead at a cost of £18,000, the monument is a 67-metre (220 ft) sandstone tower, built in the Victorian Gothic style.

Stirling Bridge

StirlingBridge

The Battle of Stirling Bridge was a battle of the First War of Scottish Independence. On 11 September 1297, the forces of Andrew Moray and William Wallace defeated the combined English forces of John de Warenne, 6th Earl of Surrey, and Hugh de Cressingham near Stirling, on the River Forth.

Falkirk Wheel

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Find out about The Falkirk Wheel, the world’s only rotating boat lift! Join a boat trip, explore the canals and enjoy a great family day out!

The Kelpies

kelpies

The Kelpies are 30-metre high horse-head sculptures, standing next to a new extension to the Forth and Clyde Canal in The Helix, a new parkland project built to connect 16 communities in the Falkirk Council Area, Scotland. Completed at the end of October 2013 after almost 8 years planning, and one year fabrication and assembly, The Kelpies now reach into the skies above Falkirk & Grangemouth in central Scotland. They are the largest works of art in Scotland, and the largest equine sculptures in the world.

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